Horse Manure I have used horse manure, cow manure, chicken manure, and llama manure.

24th November, 2021.      //   General Interest, Market Intelligence  // 

Organic fertilizers are naturally available mineral sources that contain moderate amount of plant essential nutrients. They are capable of mitigating problems associated with synthetic fertilizers. They reduce the necessity of repeated application of synthetic fertilizers to maintain soil fertility. They gradually release nutrients into the soil solution and maintain nutrient balance for healthy growth of crop plants. They also act as an effective energy source of soil microbes which in turn improve soil structure and crop growth. Organic fertilizers are generally thought to be slow releasing fertilizers and they contain many trace elements. They are safer alternatives to chemical fertilizers. However, the improper use of organic fertilizers leads to overfertilization or nutrient deficiency in the soil. Hence, controlled release of organic fertilizers is an effective and advanced way to overcome these impacts and maintain sustainable agriculture yield.

Horse manure is a good source of nutrients and a popular additive to many home gardens. Horse dung manure is highly valued by farmers because composting of horse manure makes the compost pile become super charged and also increases soil fertility, regeneration, and high quality yields. It makes a suitable and inexpensive fertilizer for plants. Horse manure can give new plants a jump start while providing essential nutrients for continual growth. Composting of horse manure does not require any special tools or structures. In fact, it can easily be composted by mixing with a shovel or pitchfork. It averts the negative effects of salinity and improves the capacity of soil water retention. This manure is recommended for crops like lettuce, tomato, and mint because it increases the crop yield with a lasting presence in the soil

Horse manure contains nutrients and fecal pathogens. As rainwater flows through manure, it picks up these nutrients and pathogens and carries them along its path. This nutrient-laden water coming from an uncovered manure pile is called leachate. If you have ever seen brown, odorous fluid around a manure pile, that is leachate (Fig. 14.3). If the leachate infiltrates into the soil, the nutrients can be taken up by plant roots or incorporated onto soil particles. However, conditions such as low plant cover, concentrated areas of manure, sandy soil, and highly concentrated leachate can cause the fluid to reach and pollute groundwater. Nitrogen is highly mobile in soil and tends to dissolve and leach as nitrate, while phosphorus adsorbs strongly to soil particles (85% of phosphorus is attached to soil and organic particles) and is more likely to be lost by runoff erosion (Westendorf and Krogmann, 2013; Welsch, 1991).

Horse manure contains nutrients and fecal pathogens. As rainwater flows through manure, it picks up these nutrients and pathogens and carries them along its path. This nutrient-laden water coming from an uncovered manure pile is called leachate. If you have ever seen brown, odorous fluid around a manure pile, that is leachate (Fig. 14.3). If the leachate infiltrates into the soil, the nutrients can be taken up by plant roots or incorporated onto soil particles. However, conditions such as low plant cover, concentrated areas of manure, sandy soil, and highly concentrated leachate can cause the fluid to reach and pollute groundwater. Nitrogen is highly mobile in soil and tends to dissolve and leach as nitrate, while phosphorus adsorbs strongly to soil particles (85% of phosphorus is attached to soil and organic particles) and is more likely to be lost by runoff erosion (Westendorf and Krogmann, 2013; Welsch, 1991).

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